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Quiz: Where to Meet Single Animal Lovers

(Photo courtesy of PetSmart Charities.)

(Photo courtesy of PetSmart Charities.)

By Michele C. Hollow of Pet News and Views

When you think about desirable qualities in a mate, it’s likely that “loves pets” is on the top of your list.

If that’s true, you’re in good company. A recent survey conducted by Match and PetSmart Charities found that 4 out of 5 singles are pet lovers. And, more than 80 percent said they have or like pets.

So where can you go to meet all of these single pet people? Take the quiz to find out.

1.  How do you take your coffee?

a. With two sugars

b. Black, no sugar or cream

c. Make it a cappuccino, please

d. With one cream

2. What is your dream vacation?

a. Anywhere on the beach

b. African safari

c. Backpacking across Europe

d. Touring America’s state parks

 3How would your best friends describe you?

a. Warm and giving

b. Active and fun

c. Adventurous and silly

d. Reliable and hard-working

 4What would you most likely pick as your dream job?

a. Head of a nonprofit organization

b. Professional athlete

c. Astronaut

d. Teacher

 5. What activity would you prefer to do your day off?

a. Volunteering with a local charity I love

b. Hiking, biking or swimming

c. Checking out an art museum

d. Working on a DIY project

6. What best describes your pet’s personality?

a. Shy but lovable

b. Extremely active

c. Chill and friendly

d. Always making me laugh

 7. What best describes where you live?

a. Small town

b. Open, woodsy area

c. Big city

d. Near a lake or ocean

 8.   What’s your favorite sport to play?

a. Golf

b. Running

c. Tennis

d. Basketball

Results

Mostly A’s – Volunteer at your local animal shelter: You’re likely giving and considerate and no stranger to volunteering for a cause you’re passionate about. A local animal shelter is a great way to meet other pet lovers who enjoy volunteering, too.  

Mostly B’s – Visit a dog park or walking trail: You’re an active, fun-loving person who loves to be outside any chance you get. Working out and enjoying the outdoors with your pet is a great way to meet other singles. You may even find a new workout buddy!

Mostly C’s – Check out a nearby pet-friendly restaurant or café: You’re probably an adventurous person who is up for anything – whether it’s the newest cuisine or latest fashion trend.  You should seek out a pet-friendly restaurant or café and grab a cup of coffee with your pet to meet someone special.

Mostly D’s – Do some weekend shopping at the farmer’s market: You’re the friend who everyone can always count on. You can probably be found working on a cool DIY project, trying out a new recipe, or getting the best deals during a sale. Why not check out your local farmer’s market to meet your new match? You never know – your soul mate could be right around the corner.

Michele C. Hollow writes about pets and wildlife for parade and other publications. She is the author of The Everything Guide to Working with Animals.  You can connect with her on Twitter.

Maine Moose Tours this Summer

By Michele C. Hollow for Pet News and Views

Moose Standing in Water

The signs along the road alerted us to watch out for moose. It was dark, and we were weary. After driving almost four hours on I-95 from the Sebago Lake region of Maine, we reached the town of Millinocket, a base for visitors to Baxter State Park. With one more mile to go, a moose appeared about a foot in front of our car. It calmly looked at us, while we perked up. Gently trotting in front, it led us to a fork in the road with a sign pointing to Twin Pines Cabins–our destination. It looked at the sign, looked at us, turned her head toward the cabins, and then gave us one last look before departing in the opposite direction.

We reached our cabin giddy from our first moose sighting. The animal was slightly bigger than a full-grown deer. Moose can be as long as 10 feet and reach up to 7 feet at the shoulder. This one didn’t have antlers, so we guessed it was a she. (Only the males have antlers.)

The moose are used to seeing people and don’t seem to mind having their picture taken. Still, our guides warned us that the animals can be skittish. When they get nervous, their eyes will move in different directions–one clockwise, the other counterclockwise. They have terrible vision, but their hearing and sense of smell are excellent.

Our moose tour was organized by the New England Outdoor Center (NEOC). We were scheduled to take a three-hour trip via pontoon, a flat-bottomed boat. Unfortunately, it was raining, so we went by air-conditioned van, which picked us up at Twin Pines (the boat and van hold up to 12 people). Our guides, Mark and Nick, are from the area and know it inside out. NEOC also runs six-hour and overnight wildlife tours, but with an 8-year-old, my husband and I thought three hours would be just fine.

Moose sightings are guaranteed. NEOC’s web site states that “if you don’t see a moose, the next tour is on us.” Nick had eagle eyes and could spot moose across a lake or hidden in the bush. Our first sighting on the tour was of two heads bobbing up and down in the Penobscot River. The rain started to let up as we got out of the van to view the moose taking a swim.

Most of Maine’s moose–there are approximately 40,000 of them–are less than 14 years old, but some live up to 25 years. The moose we saw were kind of scruffy-looking, since they were still shedding their winter coats. Most are a rich dark-chocolate color.

The best months for moose-spotting are May, June, September, October and December. In July and August, prime sightings are likely to be early in the morning or late in the evening. September and October are the best months to see full-antlered males. They shed their antlers in November and December, in preparation for growing new ones in the spring, and according to our guides, many hikers come to Maine to search for the castoffs. Some antlers have even been sold on eBay. Antlers are large and impressive. They’re made of bone–not horn–and are as distinctive as our fingerprints. They can have up to 30 tines (spikes), which are showy and useful for attracting mates.

Moving onward, we saw other moose in the distance, and were lucky to encounter one up close by the side of the road. We stood silently, just a few feet away. My son asked a few questions; the moose looked up, and, sensing that we weren’t a threat, went back to his supper. We watched him eat for a while, amazed at his size and shape: long, curved nose, bulky body and long, thin legs that hardly seem able to support all that weight (males average 850 to nearly 1,200 pounds; females, 600 to 800 pounds).

As we toured the area, our guides stopped to show us some rapids (NEOC also hosts rafting and fishing tours). In addition to telling us a bit about the area, they suggested that to blend in with the locals, we should talk like Mainers: “Tell everyone you rolled the roads for swamp donkey.” That’s local for “I went on a moose tour by van.”

If Your Go
Our log cabin at Twin Pines was large and equipped with a wood-burning stove, a small kitchen, full bathroom, two full-size beds and bunk beds. NEOC’s moose tour leaves from Twin Pines. For more information, call 1-800-766-7238.

Dogs Left Inside Cars

(Courtesy of Pets Best.)

(Courtesy of Pets Best.)

 

By Michele C. Hollow of Pet News and Views

I know that Pet News and Views’ readers would never leave their dogs or cats inside a car.  It could be life threatening for your pet.

According to Pets Best Insurance Services, today is National Heat Awareness Day.  If it is 68 degrees outside, the inside temperature of your car can jump to 81 within 10 minutes, and reach up to 115 degrees in an hour.

Please copy and share this infographic, and place it on cars. If you do see a dog or cat in a car even with the windows cracked, please call animal control.

Michele C. Hollow writes a pets/wildlife column for Parade. She is the author of The Everything Guide to Working with Animals (Adams Media).

Teaching Kids about Animals

While most kids are indoors playing video games, 9-year old Enzo Monfre can be found outdoors observing bugs, hedgehogs, and other critters that are native to his Texas backyard. It’s not that Enzo doesn’t like video games; on the contrary, he enjoys them. He just prefers to be among nature.

Enzo and capybara on Enzoology

“Animals are really cool, and some are weird in a cool way,” he explains. A few of his favorites are insects, snakes–such as pythons, constrictors, and anacondas–and hedgehogs. Enzo prefers playing with his pet hedgehog over the game Sonic the Hedgehog. According to his dad, Pete, “Enzo has been, some say, obsessed with science ever since he was three.”

Exotic Pets
He grew up with dogs, fish, and frogs. He describes his pet hedgehog, Spike, as sweet and cuddly. “There’s a difference between cuddly and furry,” says Enzo. “Spike is almost a year old, and if you hold him right and are wearing gloves, you can cuddle with him.”

His other pet is furry. Rosie’s a Chilean Rose Hair Tarantula. “It’s one of the most common types of tarantulas,” says Enzo. “It gets its name from its home and from its color.”

Home Schooling Allows Time for Teaching
Enzo, who is home schooled by his parents Heidi and Pete, loves teaching others about animals. He currently has an online TV show called Enzoology that’s both entertaining and educational. He got the idea a few years ago while watching a praying mantis in his backyard. “Our yard opens up to the woods,” he says. “We have a ton of creatures back here. A few night’s ago, I saw a fox. We get visits from possums, raccoons, lizards, and other creatures. I saw one that looked like an alien. It was a praying mantis. I picked it up and started talking about it like I was on TV. My dad grabbed the camcorder, and that was our first show.”

Sharing A Love for Animals
In addition to having his own online show, Enzo gives talks with live animals to children at schools, museums, and community centers. “Most of his knowledge comes from watching shows on National Geographic or Discovery Channel,” says Pete. “He also has an extensive library of reference books, and Heidi and I have been reading to him since an early age. We also use the Internet to fill in any gaps in knowledge and to check facts. Recently the University of Texas and NASA has started working with Enzoology to provide even more science and research.”

“He’s not a genius,” says Pete. “It’s just that he has an enormous appetite for this kind of knowledge. He’s a bright kid who works really hard. He definitely surprised John Abbott, PhD and the curator of Entomology at the University of Texas, with his knowledge. There was an event with all these entomology people, and John was there. He was quite impressed with Enzo.”

So now the University of Texas’ entomology department (along with Herpeton Exotic Pets, The Dallas Zoo, and Tiger Creek Wildlife Refuge) loans Enzo insects and other animals for his show. The other animals are caught (and later released) in Enzo’s backyard. “We also have friends who happen to own large snakes and other folks who simply love Enzoology and offer to have us feature their critters,” says Pete.

Enzo’s goal is to spread the word about animals and nature, and has plans to be an astronaut/entomologist when he grows up. In the meantime, Enzo hopes to get more kids interested in science and animals by continuing to tour and talk about animals and by recording more episodes of Enzoology.

Enzo with Rosie, his pet tarantula

Check on Pets in Foreclosed Homes

If you have a neighbor with pets who is moving or traveling, keep your eyes and ears open. While I find this hard to believe, some families intentionally abandon their animals, and when it comes to foreclosed homes, banks don’t always inspect all of the properties. “Often people will leave a pet behind without food or water,” says Anna Nirva, founder of Sunbear Squad. “On too many occasions, some families think that arrangements were made for care, but miscommunication can cause days or even weeks of starvation and dehydration.”

“There is a group of volunteer realtors in Arizona who check foreclosed-upon homes to look for abandoned animals,” says Nirva. “I wish there were more of these groups.”

If you live in a neighborhood with many foreclosed properties, check on those homes. Call out near windows and doors. Do you hear cats or dogs call back? If you do hear an animal inside, call your local no-kill shelter. By doing this you may save a life.

Sunbear Squad’s name comes from the dog who was abandoned in a home. The Sunbear Squad website inspires those who want to help animals in need.

For the Birds and Butterflies

Migration takes place in Cape May now through mid November

By Michele C. Hollow of  Pet News and Views

Crested Terns in Jarvis Sound, Cape May. (Photo by Steven M. Hollow.)

We are hot-wired to tune out excessive sights and sounds. If we did see and hear everything around us, our brains would go on overload. So, when I went birding at Cape May, NJ, I was awe-struck by the number of birders who would spot a spec in the sky and call out “Tern,” “Kingfisher,” or “Kestrel.” Each time they got it right.

I don’t have 20/20, but my eyes aren’t that bad. Even with binoculars, I had trouble identifying the types of birds that soared high in the sky. After, a day, with the experts, I started spotting birds in marshes and in trees. I still didn’t know all of their names, but each time one came into view, I would shout out an “Oh, wow!” To read the rest of the article, which I wrote for the NY Daily News, click here.

 

Sign Up Your Service Animal to Receive A Free Eye Exam

By Michele C. Hollow of Pet News and Views 

Poodle getting a free eye exam. (Photo credit: ACVO.)

Poodle getting a free eye exam. (Photo credit: ACVO.)

Service animals, which include guide, handicapped assistance, detection, military, search and rescue, and registered therapy animals, are being honored for their work with free eye exams from the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (ACVO). Registration runs from April 1-30, and the exams will be scheduled throughout the month of May.

More than 250 board certified veterinary ophthalmologists throughout the U.S., Canada, and Puerto Rico will donate their time and resources to provide free eye exam screenings to thousands of eligible service animals. Registration for service animal owners and handlers runs from April 1–30.

To qualify, animals must be “active working animals” that were certified by a formal training program or organization, or are currently enrolled in a formal training program. The certifying organization could be national, regional, or local in nature.  For more details, click here.

Pet Fosters and Tax Deductions

dog-and-cat-sleeping-together

By Michele C. Hollow for Pet News and Views

I know I am spending more time on my Parade Pets/Wildlife column. I just wrote a post about tax deductions for fosters. So, if you foster or know anyone who does, take a look.

How to Save Money on Pet Meds

By Michele C. Hollow of Pet News and Views

Pet News and Views is offering Free Pet Discount Drug Cards that’s actually good for pet and human prescription medications.  A lot of the drugs prescribed for pets are the same meds that we take—just smaller doses.  The cards are accepted at over 80 percent of all pharmacies in the U.S. and its territories, from national chains to local drug stores. The card never expires and can be used over and over again.

You can print out this card to use for your pet’s prescriptions. Just take it with the prescription from your vet to your local pharmacy to receive the discount.

This is not pet insurance or health insurance for people. All health insurance coverage for people does not cover pet medications. And not all pet health insurance plans include prescription drugs for pets. I hope you never have to use it, and that your pet will live a long and happy life. However, it is good to have on hand.

How It Works
With this card you can save up to 55% on generics and up to 15% on brand-name medications.  Subscribe to Pet News and Views and send me an e-mail (michele@petnewsandviews.com) with your name and full address saying you subscribed and want a free card. Once you get the card in the mail, take it with a prescription from your veterinarian to a participating pharmacy to receive the discount. You can use it for your own medications too! If you don’t wish to subscribe, you can just print out a copy of the card from this post and take that to your local pharmacy with a prescription from your pet’s veterinarian or from your own doctor.

For information about pet insurance, click here.

Student Petitions Big Tobacco Company to Stop Animal Testing

By Michele C. Hollow of Pet News and Views

Animals don't smoke, and neither should people.

Animals don’t smoke, and neither should people.

 

Jordan Turner, a 19-year old student and animal protection advocate from Watertown, WI, is taking on Philip Morris, the tobacco giant, to ban animal testing. He started his Change.org petition days after the third largest tobacco company in the United States, Lorillard, announced a ban on animal testing. In his petition, Jordan writes about Philip Morris’s alleged involvement in tests where rats have been forced to inhale smoke for hours at a time during experiments lasting for weeks.

“There’s no excuse for cruel animal testing for tobacco products,” says Jordon, “and I hope Philip Morris listens to the 108,000 people who have signed my petition on Change.org asking them to stop just like Lorillard has done already.”

Philip Morris USA’s parent companies, Altria Group, and Philip Morris International, both have made public statements which leave the door open for limited animal experiments in the future, while Lorillard’s updated policy says it will “not use animals unless necessary to meet regulatory requirements.”

In Pet News and Views’ opinion, these tests make no sense. We know the affects that smoking has on all of us.

For more information, and to sign the petition, click here.